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Pressure & Slow Cooker Beef or Venison Stew

stew

Nothing in the kitchen frightens our guests like a pressure cooker.  In fact, a hissing pressure cooker could be set up at haunted houses in place of those masked chainsaw-carrying guys and people would be every bit as terrified.  Tales of exploding pressure cookers are the stuff of legend.  Example: “She lifted the lid and the last thing she saw was a bright light.”  Fear not, I’ll include slow-cooker directions, too.  Bring on the beef stew, baby.

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In truth, pressure cookers to not spontaneously combust or magically convert the food into nuclear bombs.  Any mishaps involving pressure cookers is generally due to user error and is not, in fact, because pressure cooker manufacturers are secretly plotting world domination.  Well, I’m pretty sure anyway.  Let’s get going on that stew, eh?

At this point, a decision must be made… will you use a crock pot or stick with the pressure cooker?  If you decide to use a crock pot then skip to the bottom of this post for your directions.  And then you’ll see your stew in like… 6 hours.

Ingredients:

  • 3-4 Lbs. beef or venison, cut into 1″ cubes
  • 4-6 cloves garlic, minced (optional)
  • 4 onions, sliced
  • 12 potatoes, halved or quartered
  • 12 carrots, quartered
  • 2 cups water
  • 1 quart green beans
  • 1 quart stewed tomatoes
  • 3 Tablespoons flour
  • 3/4 cup wine, beer, stock, or water
  • salt, pepper, seasoning

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Heat the canner, add 3 tablespoons of olive oil or vegetable oil, and brown the meat.  Now, you add those onions, potatoes, carrots, garlic, some salt, and 2 cups of water.  Make sure the burner is on high.

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Place the lid on the pressure cooker.

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Align the arrow on the handle with the arrow on the lid.  The lid will fit snuggly in place.  Now, turn the lid so the the handles match up.  See?  Not so scary after all.

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Place the three-piece pressure regulator on the vent pipe.  That’s 15 pounds of pressure.

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Once the regulator begins to rock, set a timer for 8 minutes.  Let the canner do it’s thing but stay close by.  It’s only eight minutes.  Trust me, you can handle that.

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While your pressure cooker is chugging, pour the wine (red or white) or beer (or stock or water).  Please take note of the quart jars in the background.  Those stewed tomatoes and beans will be added once the stew has finished.

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Mix 3 tablespoons of flour into the wine/beer/stock/water (I love options, don’t you?).  Let it sit.

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At this point, the timer may have chimed.  Turn off the heat and carefully move the pressure cooker to a burner that is not hot.  Now, walk away.  When the air vent has dropped, you may remove the regulator and then unlock the lid.  Always lift the lid off toward yourself so that the lid protects your face from the steam.

Add the flour mixture, tomatoes, beans, and whatever seasoning you wish.  Makes 15-18 servings and is super to freeze or to stick in canning jars to can up.  I’ll post about canning your own soups next week.

Now for the slow-cooker recipe:

  • 1 Lb. beef, cubed
  • 1 Tablespoon oil
  • 4 carrots, quartered
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 4 potatoes, quartered
  • 14 ounces of beer, wine, water, or stock
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • salt, pepper, seasoning

Heat oil in a kettle and add the beef.  Brown the meat and then put it into the crock pot.  Pour 1/2 cup of beer/wine/stock/water into the kettle that you just cooked the beef in and bring it to a boil.  Now, pour that over the beef in the crock pot.  Add the vegetables and the rest of the liquid to the crock pot.  Cover.  Cook on low 5-6 hours or until the meat is falling apart and the vegetables are tender.  Season and serve.  You can remove some liquid, mix in a tablespoon of flour, and then add it back if you wish.  Serves 4.

beef stew

Tell me… what’s your favorite stew or soup?  Do you use a pressure cooker or slow cooker?  Want to read an interesting post: Does Searing Meat Seal in Juices?

  • Becky - Sounds just like how I like to do it, too.

    A pressure cooker is a secret weapon for quick cooking!ReplyCancel

  • Simple Livin' gal - Amen, sister. I’ll take it over a slow-cooker any day. Then it’s DONE and available for consumption at any point throughout the day. We just run indoors, heat up a bowl of it, and then back to work we go. So easy. So perfect for busy fall days.ReplyCancel

  • Rosa - A delicious looking dish! So flavorful and comforting!

    I love your new banner ;-P…

    Cheers,

    RosaReplyCancel

  • Andrew Odom - The pictures are beautiful. Excellent job. Thanks for making me hungry right at lunch time. We don’t own a pressure cooker but have been thinking of one for several reasons. This may be the “tipping point,” so to speak. hahahaha.

    Also, you say: “While your pressure cooker is chugging, pour the wine (red or white) or beer (or stock or water).” I completely agree. Now you know the secret to MY cooking. hahahahah.

    Bon apetit!ReplyCancel

  • Laura - What a post to read right now. I’m cold and sick and that beef stew looks so appetizing. Thanks for posting this, I usually have to make the stew and slowly let it cook on the low all day. Now I can have stew in minutes.ReplyCancel

  • marye~ - Oh that looks so yummy! I have to admit, I am intimidated by the pressure cooker, but I’ll give it a try, promise!ReplyCancel

  • Darrell - Hey now you’re making me hungry. I love beef stew. Especially when it’s cold outside. I think we use almost the same recipe. I know that it’s delicious. The real kicker is those nice red potatoes you used. I’ve never used them in beef stew. It makes it look so appetizing. Okay enough drooling.ReplyCancel

  • Sophie - A georgous fall meal,..real comforting too!

    Hello Lacy, How are you , girl?
    I haven’t heard from you in a long time,..

    Many greets,

    SophieReplyCancel

  • Lucy - Looks scrumptious! We had a pot of homemade portabella mushroom soup this evening… yum! Love fall and all it’s comfort food.

    Blessings,
    CindyReplyCancel

  • Canadian Doomer - I have a pressure *canner* (not a cooker), and I layer my stew ingredients right in the jars and then process them. No pre-cooking at all. It takes a little longer than pressure-cooking, but at the end of it, I have 8 quarts (or 18 pints) of stew all ready to stick in the cupboard. 🙂

    I would think that pressure cooking stew and THEN canning it would make everything fall apart, wouldn’t it?ReplyCancel

  • Ray Ann - Thanks for the options–I have a simple pressure cooker–not a canner (had one years ago but that is another story). I’ve got a blade-roast on right this moment. Although it isn’t fall, it is a chilly but sunny spring day and nothing better to warm the bones than some hot beef stew!!…

    One of my options (since the hubster doesn’t care for garlic pieces in there) is to keep a bottle of regular canola oil with large slices of garlic in it–and once the garlic flavor is infused in the oil, it is awesome to use to brown your beef as well as other uses (including in salads)…ReplyCancel

  • Tonya - This will be my first pot roast and I’m using the crock pot, because I don’t have a pressure cooker. Should I have stirred all the ingredients together before I turned it on? I put the meat w/ it’s 1/2 cup boiled water in the bottom and then put the potatoes, carrots, garlic, and onion on top and then added the rest of the water. Will that be ok? Thanks.ReplyCancel

  • Helena - Such measures are not only natural and easy-to-follow, but also relatively inexpensive.
    Flaxseed is a good choice. The summer time is the best time to have skin
    exfoliation.ReplyCancel

  • Tracy - I have an electric pressure cooker. Do you have instructions for that? I would love to try this recipe, but I am new to pressure cooking, so not comfortable with experimenting just yet.ReplyCancel

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