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A Guide to Starting a Vegetable Garden

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A freshly tilled piece of soil inspires some while it terrifies others. The very idea of juggling which plants grow well together, which will cross-pollinate to create disaster, and all the tips which fill countless gardening books is really intimidating to new gardeners.  How intimidating?  Well now, it’s more intimidating than facing a football field full of rednecks who have just been told that NASCAR, chewing tobacco, and beer have ceased to exist.  Yikes!  But have no fear! Here’s a simple easy-to-follow guide on how to start your very own organic garden.

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My sweet friend, Suzi Franks of New Zealand, created a printable guide called “Starting Out” which is well-written and informative without being overwhelming. Suzi is committed to spreading the good news of organic gardening and compiled a guide based on her own hands-on-knowledge of planting, nurturing, and harvesting.  She’s truly a wonder!

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Whenever I think about new gardeners, I am reminded of the brave souls who took part in a gardening revolution which had several titles: Victory Gardens, War Gardens, and Food Gardens for Defense. In 1917, the National War Garden Commission formed and launched a gardening campaign which resulted in over 20 million gardens. Many members of that movement were the wives and children of deployed soldiers, pilots, and sailors. Of course, farm families had been growing and canning their own vegetables for generations but thanks to clever marketing and widespread patriotism, Victory Gardens found their way into urban backyards.

Perhaps that is how your parents, grandparents, or great grandparents first learned how to plant a garden.  If so, I guarantee that they were every bit as uncertain as today’s new gardeners when planning and planting their vegetable plot.

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This gardening guide is not an act of patriotism like the Victory Garden movement but it is designed so that any urbanite or suburbanite (and even those longtime gardeners who might be interested in going organic) can transform their backyard or front lot into a wondrous plethora of veg.

Download, print, and enjoy!  Click here to download the Starting Out Guide.

Thank you, Suzi!

  • Twitter Trackbacks for A Guide to Starting a Vegetable Garden : Razor Family Farms [razorfamilyfarms.com] on Topsy.com - […] A Guide to Starting a Vegetable Garden : Razor Family Farms razorfamilyfarms.com/gardening/a-guide-to-starting-a-vegetable-garden – view page – cached A freshly tilled piece of soil inspires some while it terrifies others. The very idea of juggling which plants grow well together, which will cross-pollinate to create disaster, and all the tips which fill countless gardening books is really intimidating to new gardeners. How intimidating? Well now, it’s more intimidating than facing a football field full of rednecks who have just been… Read moreA freshly tilled piece of soil inspires some while it terrifies others. The very idea of juggling which plants grow well together, which will cross-pollinate to create disaster, and all the tips which fill countless gardening books is really intimidating to new gardeners. How intimidating? Well now, it’s more intimidating than facing a football field full of rednecks who have just been told that NASCAR, chewing tobacco, and beer have ceased to exist. Yikes! But have no fear! Here’s a simple easy-to-follow guide on how to start your very own organic garden. View page Tweets about this link Topsy.Data.Twitter.User[‘razorfamilyfarm’] = {“photo”:”http://a3.twimg.com/profile_images/60864391/simplelivingal2_normal.jpg”,”url”:”http://twitter.com/razorfamilyfarm”,”nick”:”razorfamilyfarm”}; razorfamilyfarm: “A guide to starting your very own garden: http://bit.ly/bwMWjF http://bit.ly/c2gfW1 ” 11 minutes ago view tweet retweet Filter tweets […]ReplyCancel

  • Rosa - Your garden is lovely!

    Cheers,

    RosaReplyCancel

  • warren - Agreed…great garden!ReplyCancel

  • amy - look forward to checking it out. been working on organic garden in co for about 7 years now. love it, but have so much to learn about making a thriving organic garden over here.=) thanks!ReplyCancel

  • Tia Julie - Beautiful Gardens!ReplyCancel

  • Emi - Hi Amanda,You can grow herbs very easily in coierantns, and if you have a balcony that really gives you loads more room for a lot more herbs than you’d think! You can grow herbs in pots, and there are also railing planters that hook onto the balcony (sort of like window boxes, but they attach to railings),Anyway, I’m not sure how much sun you actually have. Constant direct sun all day can actually not be best. Full sun is a little different than searing heat all day long. (I’ve given you a website below that will help with all this stuff there’s a site search button, so you can learn about sunlight requirements, as well as how to grow over 20 herbs.).As for herbs that do well in partial shade, you might try chamomile, chives, cilantro, lemon balm, and mint. Most other herbs like more sun, but again, not morning, noon, and afternoons full of strong sun. You’ll be watering a lot, too, if this were the case.Anyway, check out the source below for lots more info. about growing herbs and lots more about container gardening in general.Have fun!VirginiaReplyCancel

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