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Your Barn Door is Open

Virginia Barn
This is no ordinary barn, folks.  This barn survived the Civil War which (if you are not up on your history) is really saying something.  General Sheridan ordered his troops to burned every barn, mill, factory, and railroad in the Shenandoah Valley during the 1860s.  Well, my friends, he missed one!  Let’s explore, shall we?
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In the lower portion of the barn (which is built into the side of a small hill), the animals would come in to eat out of the elements. The farmer would walk behind the manger with bunches of hay and load the manger/hay rack. Notice the stone walls and timbers of the ceiling. How could anyone see such a barn and not want to explore?  I could not resist.

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The ladder (in the manger picture) leads to hay and wagon storage. Keep in mind that it is actually fairly dark and I did not have a tripod so taking this picture involved having the shutter open for a very long time. I tried to hold very still but the slight bit of blur is completely my fault.
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Here’s another picture of the ladder. *swoon* I just love wooden ladders in old barns.  Oh, and the stone walls… perfection.
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The view from the upstairs of the barn is lovely, too. It overlooks the stream and fields. How frightening it must have been for the farmers living there during the Civil War. Surely they must have looked out that very window only to see smoke rising from barns and mills in the Valley… wondering when their farm would be found by Sheridan’s men. Except that it wasn’t. Thank goodness!
Barnside

Pictured above is the window taken from the ground outside.  Having already claimed these outbuildings for my very own, I may have to include the barn, too.  I could live there.  Really.  There’s already a camper parked in it.  Plenty of room!
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While R. and I wandered around taking pictures and geeking out over the barn, Katy and M. discussed jam bands, bluegrass, and music festivals. Not that I am not also interested in those things — but I had a barn to explore, by golly. R. and M. completely understand that particular dilemma and solve it by frequently filling the barn with live music. Genius!

Can you think of anything better than live music in a barn that survived the Civil War?

  • Fishing Guy - Lacy: What a beauty, so nice to see it lasting through a sad time in our country.ReplyCancel

  • Simple Livin' gal - Fishing Guy: It’s a rarity to see such a barn in the Valley. I love that it made it. You know? I wonder what stories it would tell if those wall could talk.ReplyCancel

  • Matt - That’s an incredible barn! There are so many old barns and buildings around here that fall down every year.ReplyCancel

  • Simple Livin' gal - Hey Matt! Congratulations (again) on becoming a daddy! I wish I’d taken you on a barn tour when you came to Virginia. Wasn’t this a neat barn? Barns that old really are rare in the Shenandoah Valley so I felt honored to just be able to walk through it.ReplyCancel

  • Julie at Elisharose - Such a beauty. Really amazing.

    I hope this trip did a lot to heal your spirit. Now if we can just get that head of yours healed up……ReplyCancel

  • Simple Livin' gal - The trip did quite a lot to heal my spirit. Well put. It was a lot of fun and actually very emotional — but in a good way. I wept when I saw the mountains and when pulling away from each friend’s house… but I knew I was headed for another friend and it kept my energy up. There is good medicine in that.ReplyCancel

  • Holly - Hi Lacy! So wonderful to hear from you!!!

    Thanks so much for coming by to visit. Glad you liked the pictures; I definitely had fun making the video. 🙂ReplyCancel

  • Tia Julie - Beautiful!ReplyCancel

  • Rosa - A beautiful barn with great stone work!

    Cheers,

    RosaReplyCancel

  • Michele - Very cool old barn. I love old things.ReplyCancel

  • Kim - Very cool barn! Nice pics Lacy!ReplyCancel

  • Simple Livin' gal - Holly, Tia Julie, Rosa, Michele, and Kim: Thank you for commenting! I’m delighted that you share my love for old barns.ReplyCancel

  • Dawn - Awesome barn. I visited an old barn in Michigan and was able to explore it. It had grain bins and a basement area; it was so cool.ReplyCancel

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